Snapshots of the Whole and Happy Retreat in Thailand

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It’s been nearly a month and a half since the first Whole & Happy Retreat in Chanthaburi, Thailand and yet my mind wanders back to that magical time almost every single day. I wanted to share a few film images and a general feel for the beautiful retreat week I spent at FaaSai Resort and Spa.

The Whole & Happy Retreat is the perfect laid back mix of travel, adventure, yoga and self exploration. Each day the retreat group met for yoga and meditation and each day a new technique, style, or focus was presented to us to play around with. As if the yoga and meditation wasn’t enough, the Whole & Happy Retreat involved so much more. We rode our bikes up steep hills, plunged into the Thai gulf waters, drank beer at sunset and toured the farm where our organic meals originated all the while still having ample time to laze about by the pool, sip papaya smoothies and trade book recommendations while devouring our current reads. breakfast-1 first-round-12

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The Whole & Happy Retreat seemed to rest in this perfect cosmos of flowed planning instead of precise scheduling. Each night there would be a new agenda and theme on the message board and every morning our group would work our way happily through the day. From farm tours to beachside bike rides, we would move through the hours crossing joyous adventures off our list and yet somehow barely checking the clock, instead checking in with each other and our energy levels.

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first-round-18As an experienced yoga practitioner, I was delighted at the variety of classes presented and how approachable and attainable the instructors made the content for the beginners in the group and yet I never once felt bored or that the classes were predictable. Beyond the yoga and meditation, it’s such a treat to enjoy new experiences with complete strangers, it’s almost like being transported back to the first day of school on the playground. You feel shy at first until a few minutes later you realize you’re having an insane amount of fun and you look around to realize the people you once thought were strangers are now your favorite playmates.

The Whole and Happy Retreat felt like an adult summer camp aimed at elevating the travel experience while incorporating yoga and introspection. As a seasoned traveler, I cannot recommend this experience enough to individuals who are a bit apprehensive about a trip abroad or solo travelers who would find comfort among company. It’s also the perfect break for someone looking to get away in order to recharge and reinvigorate themselves for a happier reintegration back into normal life.first-round-14first-round-41first-round-61

Come read books, sip smoothies poolside, bike through fishing villages, make new Thai friends and gaze up at the stars with me. I’ll be joining the Whole & Happy crew at the next retreat in Chanthaburi, Thailand from March 17-23 and I hope you’ll come. I’d love to flow with you! From now until January 15th, book with a friend and receive $50 off of the retreat cost for a total of $550 for seven days of retreat at Faasai Eco Resort and Spa. If you need help finding a flight (they’re less than $600RT from NYC right now) or help creating a budget, I would love to help, just reach out in the comments.

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Sticky Waterfall – Bua Tong

During my adventures, I’m often captivated by the natural beauty I witness. I’ve felt the sudden and overwhelming need to hug trees, lay down in the dirt, and literally salute the sun, but every once in a while there is a place that leaves me in complete aw. A place so magical that I know I will visit again because I must show someone else the wonder. Bua Tong is that place. All afternoon I felt dumbstruck. How is it possible that this type of beauty exists in nature? I felt like I was transported to Neverland, there was just no way that what I was seeing and experiencing was real. Was I asleep? Did someone slip me acid? Am I in a storybook? Nope, the earth is really this amazing and I had the opportunity to experience it.  Let me attempt at explaining what I experienced at Bua Tong although surely no words or images will come close.

What is Bua Tong, the sticky waterfall? As unbelievable as it sounds, it’s just that. It’s sticky not slick, so one is able to walk quite easily up and down the slope of it even with water rushing by. What makes it this way? An abundance of calcium carbonate runoff.  Calcium carbonate is commonly found in Limestone, which is what lies under the thick deposits that you see covering the falls. Even though I briefly researched the waterfall (I didn’t look at any photos) before visiting, it didn’t prepare me for the experience.


Walking up a waterfall. How absurd. That’s what I thought while reading about Bua Tong. Once I arrived, I stripped down and slathered on sunscreen all the while keeping my eyes on the handful of people walking up the falls. They were making it look so easy, but they looked athletic and young, surely it was harder than it appeared. Then it was time to try it for myself, I braced myself, felt my core tighten and prepared to face plant as I took my first step. Complete shock and amazement washed over me as I took one step and then another upwards through the rushing water. With my mouth hanging open and my eyes wide, I looked around at my friends, ‘are you seeing this!?,’ is what I’m sure my expression read. Pure bliss and bewilderment followed me around the rest of the afternoon and I climbed up and down, up and down, all around  Bua Tong. The mineral deposits look like white, cloud-like  sponges and actually feel similar though a little bit harder and slightly pricky, the surface even gives slightly under a firm touch.  There were a few patches that were slick, but it is because the calcium carbonate was covered with a mossy slime. These spots are easy to see and avoid.


In the company of only about two dozen other travelers, Bua Tong had truly felt like one of the most enchanting places I’ve ever visited. Usually while traveling you’re forced to share the magic, but here it was all our own. As I looked around, I saw that most people had carved out a little space on the waterfall’s slope to sit in the sun and marvel at where their life had brought them. It was only a few minutes later that I joined my best friend, Natasha, on a sunny log in the middle of the rushing current to simply be. As I lay meditating, tiny tickles of what I thought were mosquitoes kept dragging me back to the outer world. It was in the midst of one of these tickling sensations that I opened my eyes and realized, it wasn’t mosquitos at all, but dozens of colorful butterflies. I closed my eyes again, determined to be at peace with each coming sensation. As I reflected on my weeks in Thailand, the friends in my company, my path in general, I had the overwhelming feeling of gratitude that materialized as a single teardrop from each eye. Life is beautiful. There is magic everywhere and I have so much to be grateful for, sometimes it takes a trip to never never land to remind you that every single day is a gift to be cherished and spent wisely, whether you’re climbing a sticky waterfall or navigating your work week.


Are you ready for a spiritual awakening? Kidding, but here are more details on how to reach Bua Tong and what to experience while you’re there.

What to pack:

  • Money for gas and snacks
  • Bathing suit
  • Sunscreen
  • Sunglasses
  • Book
  • Camera
  • Dry bag/waterproof bag if you have one
  • Long sleeve or sweatshirt (the ride home will be a little chilly)

How to get there:

Located over an hour outside of Chiang Mai, Bua Tong isn’t on the beaten tourist track, but still worth a visit. We rented motorbikes for the duration of our stay in Chiang Mai, which costs roughly 200-300b per day. I personally enjoy driving and navigating through crazy Thai traffic, but to some this may seem dangerous or unappealing. If you are in the latter group, you can ask your guesthouse or a tour operator for a songtaue to Bua Tong, but because it’s so far outside the city, it will be kinda pricy for Thai travel standards. I would find a cool crew the day before and convince them that they need to join you on this quest, that will surely reduce the price of the songtaue. If you’re in the former and you’re down to drive a motorbike, download either the app maps.me or google maps and download the northern Thailand map, while you have wifi that way you’ll have to problem navigating to Bua Tong. It really isn’t too tough and once you are about twenty minutes outside Chiang Mai, the traffic really slows down. I think driving the motorbikes to and from Bua Tong really added to the adventure and it was nice exploring the falls at our own pace instead of knowing a songtaue driver was waiting around for us.
What to explore :

Obviously you came for the sticky waterfall. If I were you, I’d take the stairs all the way to the bottom, stash your bag on a log (most people left their bags near the bottom of the falls unattended, I did the same and didn’t worry about my $3,000+ camera once, but do what feels comfortable to you) and start the climb up. Find a nice space to sun yourself midway or hike all the way to the top in one go. Now it’s time to hike down. Slightly scary, but equally easy. There are several ropes along the way to offer support in tricky areas  and ensure your decent is safe. Don’t you dare chicken out and take the stairs back down. You only live once. Once back at the bottom, continue a little further than the bag drop area where the stairs end. You’ll find another smaller waterfall with a shallow plunge pool at the bottom. Submerge yourself and dig your toes down into the soft, glittery sand, you did it.


After you’ve had your fill of the waterfall, hike back up to the tip and explore the natural seven colored fountain. Even if you’re famished and tired (we were both) you can make it to the fountain. It’s less than a five minute walk and it’s a wooden boardwalk the entire way. You’ll be amazed at how insanely clear the water is and you’ll enjoy leafy jungle views on the way to and from.

There’s also another short hike depicted on a large wooden sign near the entrance to the fountain trail, we decided against it only because we were sure to die of hunger (or morph into hangry demons) at any moment. We contemplated buying a snack from the small restaurant on site and then completing the hike, but we wanted to have time to stop on the road for a late lunch and return to Chiang Mai before dark.


Where to eat & stay:

On the way back to Chiang Mai, we stopped at the loveliest little guesthouse and restaurant. If we had more time, we certainly would have stayed the night. The guest house is called Howiman or Horwiman. You pull off the road across from Lhongkhoa Resort and head straight down the dirt hill, you’ll immediately see a grouping of dark wooden buildings on the left and you’ll probably hear a yapping little dog, and you’ll know you’re in the right place. If we could have stayed and drank our Chiangs in frosty mugs all evening we totally would have. Next time I visit Bua Tong I will.  


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Two Bits

We want to break down these internet barriers and invite you into our lives and we’re hoping you’ll do the same.  You are welcome to share a bit of your week or day in the comments, or if they’re better represented by a photo, tag us on instagram @liveseasoned

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Sarah Here :

Happy Friday! Yesterday I was hit with a wave of sinus pressure that knocked me off my feet – literally – I just sat on my yoga mat for a few hours.  I stretched, pondered, meditated, and just generally sat in a hazy fog of sinus annoyance.  Today I’m going to try to work through it by writing about the Annapurna Circuit Trek.  I was reminded of another beautiful, high-altitude adventure yesterday when my pop asked me for this image from Phu Chi Fah, Thailand:

Live Seasoned Phu Chi Fah, Thailand 12-11-103Phu Chi Fah is a tiny village perched on the northeastern side of the Phi Pan Nam Range, a mountain chain that borders northern Thailand and Laos.  There’s an amazing set of cliffs that one can hike up in the dark in order to watch the sunrise.  It’s a spectacular sight as the clouds roll in looking like water.Live Seasoned Phu Chi Fah, Thailand 12-11-100 I’ve never been so cold as the hour I sat waiting on a windy cliff for the sun to come up.Live Seasoned Phu Chi Fah, Thailand 12-11-101 Live Seasoned Phu Chi Fah, Thailand 12-11-102 When it finally rose and turned the landscape into a warm orangey scene, I felt like the entire morning had been a dream.Live Seasoned Phu Chi Fah, Thailand 12-11-104 I was most intrigued by the weekend trading market that sprang up on the side of the mountain that Sunday morning.  Driving through, I was glued to the bus window, vowing to return and explore the mountain market someday.  That was five years ago, but I still think about it often.Live Seasoned Phu Chi Fah, Thailand 12-11-105 Then there was this amazing vegetarian restaurant that Saleem and I visited at least four times that weekend.  The food in northern Thailand is unlike the rest of the country’s cuisine. So spicy and delicious.Live Seasoned Phu Chi Fah, Thailand 12-11-106 After lunch, we wandered into a shop that had at least a hundred different kinds of shoelaces.  I was over the moon because I had been wanting black laces in these sneaks for over a year, but had been unwilling to spend more that $1 for new ones. Seriously, how much better do they look?Live Seasoned Phu Chi Fah, Thailand 12-11-107The light in the bus terminal was just unreal, the whole weekend had been unreal. Can you spot the dog?

I’m off to write all weekend long.  I may take a break to watch my Panthers destroy Katie’s Broncos in the Super Bowl! By watch, I mean I’ll make finger food to enjoy while I pretend to cheer for the team from my home state.  Katie is probably just realizing now that the Broncos are playing in the big game…

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Tips For Visiting Temples

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Visiting ancient temples and beautiful mosques abroad is quite popular and enjoyable.  It surprised me a little bit since I’m not religious at all, but it’s more of a cultural experience than a religious one.  If you’re new to traveling or have never visited a temple abroad there are a few things you should know before you go.  I’ve learned some tips and tricks along the way and thought it could be helpful to share them here.  I feel so lucky to have visited dozens of religious sites in Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Kathmandu, India and beyond.  Read on to discover all the things I’ve learned along the way.

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Travel Bug: Bangkok, Thailand

From time to time, Katie and I will indulge our inner travel bug and share past, present and upcoming adventures with you. Today is our first of the feature, pack your bags, you’re headed to Thailand!

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If you have never ventured to Bangkok, you probably have a few ideas of what it is like from movies like The Hangover Part II, Dangerous Bangkok, and Into The Sun (plus a trillion other action movies); if you have been fortunate enough to miss those thrillers, picture bright lights, speedy taxis, street food and lots and lots of people.  Bangkok is one of those cities that takes you in, spins you around and spits you out.  Thankfully there are lovely Thai beaches just a bus ride away and after a week in BKK one needs a nap, a really long nap.

As a traveler, cities aren’t high on my list.  I try to stick to small towns and natural attractions; I tend to search for those hidden gems and slices of everyday living, but because I spent the better part of a year in Thailand, I learned to love and embrace Bangkok, a city with more than 7 million inhabitants.  I had the opportunity to explore Bangkok multiple times for various reasons like typical tourism, friend’s birthdays, English teaching orientation, family visits and weekend-long shopping sprees.  Each time I ventured into the city, I felt more and more comfortable and willing to explore new places and enjoy old hangouts.  Bangkok was no longer an enormous scary city (ok, it’s still pretty huge), but rather a transit hub and pit stop that I visited every month while living in Thailand.  I began to recognize neighborhoods, streets, parks, particular statues, elevated walkways, and even specific vendors and food carts, it became a city of smaller neighborhoods and much more manageable to wrap my head around.

If you are planning a trip to Thailand and you want to experience the whirlwind that is Bangkok, I present you with the Bangkok City Guide! Do some research before you go (what/where do you want to experience, eat, and sleep?), but for the most part let the city guide you, you’ll probably get lost a couple times, but you’ll also find something mystical that no city guide or website could have warned you about.

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Getting around:

  • Tuk Tuk – My favorite type of transit for short trips. Tiny, a little bit scary and definitely not safe, tuk tuks are always an adventure.  Tuk tuks will get you where you need to go quicker than a taxi, but don’t take them during rush hour.  Sitting at exhaust level in standstill traffic will certainly take years off your life (I have no scientific evidence, only experience).  Tuk tuk rides are cheap (usually $1-$3) and the fare should be negotiated before you agree to go anywhere.  Haggle in increments of 5-10 baht and make sure you and the driver are happy with the agreed upon fare before take off.
  • Taxi – I have mixed feelings about taxis in BKK. On one hand, you don’t have to negotiate a fare, on the other hand, half of the drivers have no idea where you’re trying to go.  The fare is metered, so you are guaranteed a fair fare, har har. (If a driver doesn’t turn on his meter, ask him to do so, if he refuses, do not get into the cab.)  Drivers in BKK don’t have to pass a qualification exam so many of them know some parts of the city, but not all and especially not specific stores, restaurants and hotels.  I got into the habit of carrying a city map with me and always (ALWAYS!!) having a card in my wallet with the hotel name and address written in Thai. Half of the time I felt like my driver toured the entire city before taking me to my destination.  They are either too shy, greedy or embarrassed to ask for directions or kick you out of the cab.  I’ve found tuk tuk drivers simply shout out their questions and directional issues to other drivers en route and resolve any issues rather quickly.
  • Bus – I rarely took the bus to get around BKK, but then again, I rarely take the bus in any city.  I find buses to be slow, cumbersome and unpredictable.  If I’m going to navigate traffic, I want something small like a tuk tuk or taxi and if I want to skip out on rush hour, I’ll squeeze into the skytrain.  Bus travel is cheap, usually ranging from 50 cents to a dollar. There are also a number of buses that run 24/7. I shy away from buses because roads could be closed, buses could be out of service, etc. I think the possibility of getting completely lost and turned around and not having anyone to help me through the confusion scares me a little bit (flashback to getting lost in north Philadelphia as an 18-year-old…).
  • BTS Skytrain – Is the cleanest, most reliable and also most expensive option.  Personally, I loved the skytrain.  If you like to eliminate risk in your life, this option is for you.  Simply look at the transit map and signage (it’s all in English) and you’ll have no troubles. Just make sure you walk the right direction once you’re off the skytrain (says the gal who walked approximately 1.5 miles in the wrong direction…) A single ride costs anywhere from 50 cents to $1.50 and a day pass is $4. The skytrain is squeaky clean (polar opposite of subways) and air conditioned.  During rush hour it is crazy crowded, but fortunately having body odor is considered offensive in Thai culture so getting a stinky pit in your face is far from average.
  • MRT Subway – The MRT is similar to the skytrain, quick, clean and reliable.  It is also similarly priced and can get really crowded during morning and evening rush hour. There was severe flooding in Thailand during 2011 and the MRT was under construction (because of flooding repairs and also because it is a relatively new transit system).    I didn’t take the MRT a lot, but mostly because it was always an afterthought.

Sleeping Around:

  • Lub d Bangkok Silom –  only the best hostel ever. Seriously.  Lub d (meaning ‘sleep well’) is clean, safe and really cool.  It’s only two blocks from the skytrain (Chong Nonsi station) and it’s located in Chinatown, which has a lot of great street food and markets and it’s close to the cooking class.  Lub d has a variety of rooms so if you’re not comfortable sharing, it’s all good, they have you covered.  If you are interested in a common room, each bed has it’s own locker so your stuff is super secure.  I love Lub d because they have a 24 hr reception staff (super handy if you’re headed to the airport really early or if your taxi picks you up two hours late and you arrive in Bangkok at 1 a.m.), storage room for your luggage (in case you check out, but want to explore without toting everything around), free wifi and lots of common space (bar, cinema and stellar library).  I cannot say enough great things about Lub d. Lub d is pricy as far as Thai hotels go (ranging from $15 for a dorm style room –  $28 for a private double), but it is worth every penny.
  • U-Baan Guesthouse – quaint and convenient. I liked U-Baan (meaning stay home) for it’s size and location.  It’s located close to the skytrain (Wong Wain Yai station) yet it’s out of the hustle and bustle of BKK. There is street food nearby and tons of taxis waiting to take you out on the town.  In extremely crowded areas finding a taxi at night can be tough. Prices ranged from $10-$15 per bed.
  • Most hotels that I stayed at in Bangkok were great, the two above just stood out to me.  Hotels in BKK will cost anywhere from $15-$$$.

Eating Out:

There really is no way to go wrong in terms of chow in Thailand.  Instead of telling you specific restaurants or carts, I’ll give you a rundown of my favorite dishes while I was abroad.  Each of these dishes should cost about $1 on the street.

I was mainly a vegetarian in Thailand so a lot of these dishes are veggie heavy unless you specify.  To alter the dish you add the adjective to the end of the name of the dish.  To add chicken say ‘Guy’ for instance: ‘Pad Thai Guy,’ with pork say, ‘Moo,’ with only vegetables say, ‘Mang Sow E Rat’ and to make it vegan say, ‘Jeh’  I have spelled the names of each dish the way they’re pronounced, good luck ordering!

  • Pad Thai – You’ve all had it (hopefully) it is much different and way better when it’s made on the street in BKK. Squeeze a lime over your dish and enjoy!
  • Pad See Uw – Is basically veggie stir fry with a broad noodle tossed with garlic soy sauce. It is delicious and filling.
  • Khoa Pad Pak – Is your basic stir fried white rice made with veggies and soy sauce. To add an egg (my favorite way to eat it) say, ‘Khoa Pad Pak Khi Dow.’
  • Som Tum – Green papaya salad and a must eat!  It’s a spicy salad made with crunchy papaya and peanuts with a sauce made of fish sauce (but it doesn’t taste fishy at all), sour lime, sugar and hot peppers.  Say, ‘My Phet’ if you want it less spicy, which I highly recommend (don’t worry you’ll still be sweating).
  • Khao Niaow Ma Muang – Mango sticky rice a.k.a the best dessert ever.  This dessert is delicious heaven, but it is sweet and heavy so make sure you find someone to share it with.

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A couple tips:

  • Order your drinks without ice.  The ice is often made with dirty water and/or is transported in unsanitary ways (read: block of ice carried on a shirtless man’s back)  By ordering your drink without ice you have a better chance of staying healthy in Thailand.
  • Visit places that you think you know, like 7/11. You’ll be surprised and delighted by all the differences.
  • Try crazy looking fruits, I assure you that they are all delicious even if you have no idea what you just ate.
  • Point, smile, laugh and pay. You may order your new favorite dish or you might accidentally get a sad looking omelet on top of white rice.
  • Eat the bugs!! I did and I lived. You only live once and who knows, in ten years we might all be eating bugs.

Acting Out:

  • Silom Thai Cooking School – The experience I had at Silom is so near and dear to me.  Katie (shout out to the other half of live seasoned!) came to visit me in Thailand and this was one of our favorite activities. Spending a few hours learning a new skill with her was a lot of fun and something I will never forget.  That single experience has tempted me to take a cooking class whenever I travel, but I can never seem to find one so reasonably priced and educational.  The class ($30 per person) included a market tour (of a nearby veggie market) and an explanation of essential to Thai cooking ingredients.  After the market tour, you spend four hours creating six different Thai dishes and they send you home with a cookbook! Each student sits on the floor with their own cutting board and ingredient basket and prepares the meal while the chef explains the how and the what of it all. Then you take your ingredients to your individual wok and burner to prepare the dish!  The class was run smoothly with lots of instruction, explanation and true to Thai culture lots of jokes and smiles. Culture and cuisine are my two favorite aspects of travel and this cooking class combines both. Double score!
  • Pak Khlong Talat (flower market) – Take a quick trip here in the early morning.  It’s more of a wholesaler experience so I didn’t buy anything, but the sheer number of flowers and vendors is truly amazing and beautiful.  This market won’t take up a bunch of your time so it is definitely worth seeing. Don’t bother visiting after 10 a.m. though, it quiets down a lot and you won’t think it’s that impressive.
  • Chatuchak (weekend market) – If you like shopping, even a little bit, you must take a trip to the weekend market.  The market is 27 acres of stalls (over 15,000!) so you can really find a.n.y.t.h.i.n.g. Lots of folks are overwhelmed by the market because of the tight spaces, large crowds, and strange smells, but that was all part of the charm for me.  My advice? Keep your wallet close, haggle a lot, and venture deep into the center of the market.  You’ll find that there are lots of different sections in the market, anything from spice collections, home goods, handmade designer clothes, pets (cue strange smells), books and souvenirs.  There is so much to take in (and buy!), which is why I went to the market five times while I lived in Thailand! I still regret not buying the big ziplock baggie of saffron for $5. I would mention stalls and food stands to check out, but really that is part of the adventure of it all and who knows, maybe you’ll find something even tastier than I did!
  • Soi Cowboy – If you want to drink and dance, go to Soi Cowboy.  It is definitely pricier than most clubs and bars in Bangkok, but it is also more upstanding.  You probably won’t get hit on by prostitutes here (unfortunately that is the reality of many nightclubs in Bangkok) and you’ll go home with your wallet.  That comes with a price though, these clubs charge entrance fees and they are packed to the gills. The music is usually electronic or a live DJ and you might find that you (and your American friends) are one of the few who are dancing!  No lie, we had to encourage beg and plead with the club goers squeezed in beside us to dance so that we had room to move around!
  • Grand Palace –  If you’re the type to check out amazing architecture than head over to the Grand Palace! It was particularly hot and very VERY crowded when we went so I can’t say I had the best time.  It’s worth visiting if you like that type of thing though!
  • People watching – Everywhere and anywhere. The city is the best place to pick a seat and take it all in.  I love people watching and BKK provides some interesting sights.
  • Khaosan Road – You’ll probably hear about Khaosan. My advice is to stay far away.  In my opinion, it’s a pretty trashy touristy street, not much culture or authenticity to be found. That being said, since lots of tourists frequent Khaosan there are a plethora of delicious restaurants in the area, especially Ethos Vegetarian Restaurant.  Ethos has a variety of  healthy vegetarian options, which can sometimes be hard to find on street carts.

Man this post made me really miss Thailand and that sweet penguin watch that I found at Chatuchak. I hope you enjoyed hearing a big about Bangkok and its endless possibilities.  Have you been? Have anything specific you’d like to share? Let us know!

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